Ways to Determine Your AC Power Consumption Costs

Most of us are aware there are ways to improve our are conditioning and heating system’s efficiency and have been diligently sealing leaks and performing maintenance tasks to preserve their effectiveness. A Residential Power Intake Study conducted in 2012 actually reflected a 10% decrease in power usage specifically for home heating and air conditioning.

The reduction is considered partially attributable to more energy efficiency in units available for our homes as well as the improved diligence of homeowners to maintain and facilitate repairs, while also ensuring their homes are sufficiently sealed to avoid escaped heat (or cool air in the summer). Experts expect the decline to continue as homeowners continue to upgrade their homes and ensure they are maximizing energy efficiency.

There is a means by which to determine exactly what your air conditioning and heating unit is costing in the way of utility bills. Follow the steps below to see what you’re up against where it comes to AC Consumption Costs.

SEER Score

Your a/c system has a specific SEER (Seasonal Energy Efficiency Ratio) ranking. You could ask your home heating and a/c repair service specialist for more details concerning the SEER ranking, however, to summarize, it’s a measure of your system’s effectiveness in regard to power consumption versus the cooling temperature generated. The greater the ranking, the higher your system’s efficiency. You’ll find that older systems will carry a rating of 6 or below.

Heat Capacity

Heat capacity is gauged in British Thermal Units-hour or BTU-h, a measure of the amount of heat that can be processed by your unit. Those with high capacity typically have high rates of consumption as well, but can successfully cool larger areas. Your manual or the manufacturer’s website will have the information you need to determine your system’s efficiency.

Calculating Your AC Power Consumption Costs

Begin by dividing your unit’s heat capacity by the SEER rating. If you need help with the numbers, consult your local professional. Multiply the result by the number of hours you run the unit each day and each month. Then, multiply each by your energy rates to get a general idea of your daily and monthly expenses.

As an example, if your unit’s capacity is 27,000 BTUh with a SEER of 7, then it’s using 3,857 watts per hour. Multiplied by 8 hours per day, and then by 30 days in a month is 925,714 watts/month, or 925 kilowatts/month.  Apply your energy rates to the result for an idea of what you’re spending.

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